Crop Management


CROP MANAGEMENT SCHEDULES

The following schedules are intended as a guide or checklist. Not all the management actions listed will be necessary for every orchard. 

Apple Management Schedule

This schedule lists the seasonal crop management actions for apples with links to the appropriate sections in the online Guide describing the practices. See the Apple Spray Schedule for the curretn recommended chemical control options.

Winter (December - early March)

•  Record freezing temperatures for Fall, Winter and Spring 

•  Prune trees, including removal of shoots with white tips (mildew) and cankers or infested with shothole or ambrosia beetles 

•  Review spray and pest records, as well as fruit packouts, from the past season

•  Calibrate orchard and weed sprayers 

•  Calculate tree row volumes 

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed; if Casoron 4G (dichlobenil) is to be used, apply when soil begins to thaw

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage, and control as needed:

  1)   Pocket gophers 

  2)   Voles

  3)   Columbian ground squirrel

  4)   Deer 

•  Apply dormant zinc sulphate spray (before oil) as required 

•  Apply delayed dormant spray for rosy apple aphid, European   fruit scale, San Jose scale, European red mite eggs and other pests

•  Arrange to have beehives placed in orchard at the beginning of bloom

•  Apply nitrogen and other nutrients as needed 

•  Prepare soil for planting

Spring (late March - May)

•  Complete pruning trees

•  Plant, fertilize and prune new trees

•  Install tree support system and tie trees to supports

•  Protect against frost as needed

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed 

•  Avoid mowing blooming ground covers 1 week before bloom until after petal fall (See western flower thrips)

•  Apply nutrient fertilizers to ground as needed 

•  Apply foliar nutrients as needed 

•  Place bees in orchards prior to the king blooms beginning to open 

•  Apply blossom thinning sprays 

•  Bloom and post-bloom disease control

  1)   Monitor for scab infection periods and apply treatments as needed

  2)   Monitor for fire blight and apply fire blight sprays as needed

  3)   Apply powdery mildew sprays as  needed 

•  Hang mating disruption dispensers for apple clearwing moth by end of May (if previous year's total moth capture less than 25)

•  Monitor for insect and mite pests

  1) Check codling moth trap counts weekly online (OKSIR.org/trap data), recorded on trap bottoms, or emailed upon request from the OKSIR Program  

  2)   Mark and monitor Fruittree and European leafroller egg hatch 

  3)   Monitor before and through bloom for:

    •  Fruittree/European and Obliquebanded/Threelined leafroller larvae 

    •  Green/Brown fruitworm larvae 

   •   Bruce spanworm larvae

    •  Mullein bug (Campylomma) 

   •  Eyespotted bud moth larvae

  4)   Monitor leaves for leaf-feeding and beneficial insects and mites:

    •  European red mite, McDaniel spider mite and Apple rust mite

   •   Rosy apple aphid

    •  Other aphids (Apple, Apple grain, Woolly apple)

    •  Tentiform leafminer and its parasite if it was a problem the previous year

    •  White apple leafhopper

    •  Beneficial insects (deraeocorislacewings, ladybugspredatory mitessyrphidsand predatory mites 

•  Begin irrigation as needed

•  Begin fertigation in established plantings 

•  Apply lime if needed 

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed 

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed:

  1)   Pocket gophers 

  2)   Voles 

  3)   Columbian ground squirrel

  4)   Deer 

•  Apply post bloom chemical thinners 

•  Prune crabapple pollinizers

•  Girdle (score) very vigorous trees between bloom and 14 days after bloom

•  Keep spray and pest records up to date (See Resources - Grower Records for recording forms.)

Summer (June - August)

•  Apply supplemental nutrient sprays   (e.g. boron, zinc) as indicated by previous year’s leaf analysis results

•  Irrigate as needed

•  Begin fertigation of newly planted blocks

•  Hand thin fruit

•  Continue disease control

  1)   Continue to monitor scab infection periods

  2)  Cut out wood diseased with perennial canker (European & anthracnose in coastal areas)& fire blight 

  3)  Begin application of calcium sprays for bitter pit and other low calcium disorders if needed

•   Have leaf analysis done (July) 

•  Continue monitoring insects and mites

  1)   Use trap data to determine need and timing for codling moth sprays 

  2)   Sample fruit clusters for summer leafrollers and bud moth (Aug) 

  3)   Inspect trees for rosy apple and woolly apple aphids 

  4)   Monitor San Jose scale 

  5)   Monitor shothole borer and ambrosia beetles (August) 

  6)   Sample leaves for other leaf-feeding and beneficial insects and mites:

•  European red and McDaniel spider mites (especially if pesticides harmful to predatory mites have been used)

•  Apple rust and pear-leaf blister mites 

•  Tentiform leafminer and its parasite  if abundant in spring

•   White apple leafhopper

•  Beneficial insects (ladybugs, lacewings, anthocorids, deraeocoris, campylomma, spiders, predaceous midge, syrphids) and predatory mites 

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed

•  Apply Retain for maturity delay, stop drop and / or split prevention 

•  Train young trees (August)

•  Treat for pinpoint scab as needed 

•  Apply ethephon/NAA to McIntosh as needed 

•  Monitor for birds and control if needed 

•  Check fruit maturity

•  Summer prune if necessary

•  Apply boron to ground if needed 

•  Take soil samples for replant, nutrient and pH analysis  

Fall (September - November)

•  Treat for perennial canker (European and anthracnose in coastal areas), if necessary 

•  Apply stop drop sprays 

•  Harvest apples

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed

  1) Pocket gophers 

  2) Voles

  3) Columbian ground squirrel

  4) Bears 

  5) Deer

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed, if Casoron 4G (dichlobenil) is to be used, apply prior to soil freezing 

•   Irrigate, if needed, following harvest, then blow out lines

•  Remove weak, diseased or dead trees

•  Remove trees in blocks to be replanted and take soil samples for analysis

•  Begin dormant pruning

•   New planting preparation

  1) Fall fumigation 

 

Cherry Management Schedule

This schedule lists the seasonal crop management actions for cherries with links to the appropriate sections in the online Guide describing the recommended practices. See the Cherry Spray Schedule for the current recommended chemical control options.

Winter (December - early March)

•  Prune trees, including removal of shoots infested with shothole borer
  and ambrosia beetles 

•  Remove overwintering bacterial, cytospora and coryneum blight
  cankers, and other diseased wood 

•  Review spray and pest records, as well as packouts, from the past season

•  Calibrate orchard and weed sprayers 

•  Calculate tree row volumes 

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed - if Casoron 4G (dichlobenil) is to be used, apply when soil begins to thaw 

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed:

  1)   Pocket gophers 

  2)   Voles

  3)   Columbian ground squirrel

  4)   Deer 

•  Apply dormant zinc sulphate spray (before oil) as required  

•  Apply delayed dormant spray for black cherry aphid, San Jose scale,
  red mite eggs, and mealybugs 

•  Prepare soil for new plantings

•  Collect soil samples for nutrient and pH analysis 

•  Arrange to have beehives placed in orchard 

Spring (late March - May)

•  Avoid mowing a blooming ground cover 1 week before bloom until petal fall (See western flower thrips)

•  Complete pruning of mature trees

•  Plant, fertilize and prune new trees

•  Protect against frost as needed

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed

•  Apply nitrogen, and other nutrients as needed 

•  Place beehives in the orchard prior to the first blossoms opening

•  Bloom and post-bloom disease control

  1)   Treat for brown rot at blossom 

  2)   Apply powdery mildew sprays as needed 

•  Monitor for insect and mite pests

  1)   Put out yellow sticky traps for cherry fruit flies and check weekly

  2)   Monitor before and through bloom for:

•  Fruittree/European and obliquebanded/threelined leafroller larvae

•  Green fruitworm larvae

•  Eyespotted bud moth larvae

  3)   Monitor leaves for leaf-feeding and beneficial insects and mites:

•  European red mite 

•  Black cherry aphid

•  Beneficial insects (labybugs, anthocorids, deraeocoris, lacewings, predaceous midge, spiderssyrphids) and predatory mites

  4)   Monitor and treat for apple mealybug, carrier of little cherry disease virus

  5)   Inspect trees for shothole borer and ambrosia beetles 

  6)   Set out baited traps to monitor for European paper wasp queens

  7)  Set out baited traps to monitor for sportted wing drosophila and check weekly through to harvest

•  Begin irrigation as needed

•  Apply lime as needed 

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed 

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed:

  1)   Pocket gophers 

  2)   Voles

  3)   Columbian ground squirrel 

  4)   Deer 

•  Keep spray and pest records up to date 

Summer (June - August)

•  Apply supplemental nutrient sprays (e.g. boron, zinc) as indicated by previous year’s leaf analysis results

•  Hang pheromone mating disruption lures for peach tree borer and check weekly

•  Apply gibberellic acid product to fresh-market fruit 

•   Irrigate as needed

•  Continue disease control

  1)   Treat for brown rot as needed 

  2)   Cut out wood diseased with bacterial canker and powdery mildew 

•  Continue monitoring insects and mites and take action as necessary

  1)   Check traps for cherry fruit flies 

  2)   Set out and monitor peach tree borer pheromone traps 

  3)   Monitor fruit clusters for summer leafroller and bud moth larvae

  4)   Monitor San Jose scale 

  5)   Inspect trees for shothole borer and ambrosia beetles (Aug) 

  6)   Check and refresh baited traps for European paper wasps

  7)   Continue to check spotted wing drosophila trap(s) and 

•  Inspect trees for Pear sawfly (pear slug) 

•  Inspect leaves for  Rust mites 

•  Inspect trees for beneficial insects (labybugsanthocoridsderaeocorislacewingspredaceous midgespiderssyrphidsand predatory mites

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed 

•  Have leaf analysis done (July) 

•  Monitor for bird pests or damage and control as needed

•  Monitor mature fruit for symptoms of Little Cherry virus.   Report any suspicious trees to BCMA Kelowna (250-861-7211)

•  Harvest fruit

•  Consider postharvest application of zinc if needed

•  Apply boron to ground if needed 

Fall (September - November)

•  Continue disease control

  1)   Apply copper spray for coryneum blight as needed 

  2)   Remove disease cankers and dead wood

•  Take soil samples for nutrient analysis 

•  Postharvest treatment, if necessary, for:

  1)   Cherry fruit flies  

  2)   San Jose scale 

  3)  European red and spider mites 

  4)   Mealybugs

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed:

  1)   Pocket gophers 

  2)   Voles

  3)   Columbian ground squirrel

  4)   Deer

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed; if Casoron 4G (dichlobenil) is to be used, apply just prior to soil freezing 

•  Irrigate, if needed, then blow out lines

•  Remove weak, diseased or dead trees

•  Remove trees in blocks to be replanted and take soil sample for analysis

•  Prepare for new plantings

 

Peach Management Schedule

This schedule lists the seasonal crop management actions for peaches with links to the appropriate sections in this online Guide where the recommended practices are described. See the Peach Spray Schedule for current recommended chemical control options.

Winter (December - early March)

•  Prune trees, including removal of shoots infected with brown rot, powdery mildew and coryneum blight

•  Remove branches and limbs infected with cytospora canker

•  Review spray and pest records, as well as fruit packouts, from the past season

•  Calibrate orchard and weed sprayers  

•  Calculate tree row volumes 

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed; if Casoron 4G (dichlobenil) is to be used, apply when soil begins to thaw 

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed:

  1)   Pocket gophers 

  2)   Voles

  3)   Columbian ground squirrel 

  3)   Deer 

•  Apply delayed dormant spray for green peach aphid, lecanium and San Jose scale, European red mite eggs and other pests 

•  Arrange to have beehives placed in orchard prior to the beginning of bloom

Spring (late March - May)

•  Mow ground cover before bloom and thereafter as needed

•  Avoid mowing a blooming ground cover 1 week before bloom until petal fall in nectarine blocks (See western flower thrips)

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed 

•  Protect against frost as needed

•  Apply nitrogen, and other nutrients as needed 

•  Bloom and post-bloom disease control:

  1)   Treat for powdery mildew and peach leaf curl, if necessary  

  2)   Apply coryneum blight and powdery mildew spray if needed 

  3)   Apply brown rot sprays at blossom

•  Monitor for insect and mite pests

  1)   Put out pheromone traps for peach twig borer and monitor weekly

  2)   Inspect leaves and blossoms before and through bloom for fruittree/European and obliquebanded/threelined leafroller and green fruitworm larvae

  3)   Inspect leaves for other leaf-feeding and beneficial insects and mites

•  European red mite 

•  Green peach aphid 

•  Lygus bugs 

•  Beneficial insects (ladybugs, lacewings, anthocorids, deraeocoris, syrphids) and predatory mites

  4)   Monitor for shothole borer (May) 

•  Begin irrigation as needed

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed

  1)   Pocket gophers 

  2)   Voles

  3)   Columbian ground squirrel

  4)   Deer 

•  Thin blossoms or fruit

•  Keep spray and pest records up to date 

Summer (June - August) 

•  Apply supplemental nutrient sprays (e.g. boron, zinc) as indicated by previous year’s leaf analysis results

•  Irrigate as needed

•  Hang pheromone mating disruption lures for peach tree borer 

•  Consider reapplication of nitrogen on sandy soils 

•  Complete fruit thinning

•  Continue disease control

  1)   Cut out wood diseased with brown rot  

  2)   Apply brown rot spray if needed 

•  Continue monitoring insects and mites

  1)   Put out pheromone traps for peach tree borer and peach twig borer monitor weekly

  2)   Monitor green peach aphid 

  3)   Control San Jose scale and lecanium  scale  

  5)   Sample leaves for other leaf-feeding and beneficial insects and mites

•  European red and rust mites 

•  European earwig

•  Summer leafrollers 

•  Beneficial insects (ladybugs, lacewings, anthocorids, deraeocoris, predaceous midge, syrphids) and mites

  1)   Monitor for shothole borer (August) 

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed 

•  Have leaf analysis done (July) 

•  Harvest fruit

  1)   Treat fruit for rhizopus rot and brown rot as required

•  Apply boron to ground if needed 

•  Take soil samples for nutrient analysis 

•  Apply postharvest copper spray treatment for

  1)   Coryneum blight 

  2)   Peach leaf curl 

•  Monitor for rodent pests or damage and control as needed

•  Monitor for weeds and control if needed; if Casoron 4G (dichlobenil) is to be used, apply before soil freezing 

•  Irrigate, if needed, following harvest, then blow out lines

•  Remove weak, diseased or dead trees

•  Remove trees in blocks to be replanted and take soil samples for analysis

•  Prepare for new plantings

 

Pear Management Schedule

This schedule lists the seasonal crop management actions for pears with links to appropriate sections in this online Guide where the practices are described. See the Pear Spray Schedule for the current recommended chemical control options.

Winter (December - March)

•  Prune trees

•  Remove fire blight cankers (disinfect pruners between each cut)          

•  Review spray and pest records from past season

•  Calibrate orchard and weed sprayers 

•  Calculate tree row volumes 

•  Apply dormant and/or delayed dormant treatments for pear psylla, San Jose scale, pear rust and pearleaf blister mites and European red mite eggs 

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed; if Casoron 4G (dichlobenil) is to be used, apply when soil begins to thaw 

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed

  1)   Pocket gophers 

  2)   Voles

  3)  Columbin ground squirrel

  4)   Deer 

•  Arrange to have beehives placed in orchard 

•  New planting preparation

Spring (late March - May)

•  Avoid mowing a blooming ground cover 1 week before bloom until petal fall 

•  Complete pruning of mature trees

•  Plant, fertilize and prune new trees

•  Protect against frost as needed

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed 

•  Apply nitrogen, and other nutrients as needed

•  Apply foliar nutrients as needed 

•  Place beehives in orchard when 30-50% of blossoms are open 

•  Bloom and post-bloom disease control

  1)   Treat for powdery mildew, if necessary 

  2)   Apply fire blight sprays as needed 

•  Begin applying calcium sprays to Anjou if needed to prevent cork spot and alfalfa greening (mid-May) 

•  Chemical thinning of Bartlett pear

•  Monitor for insect and mite pests

  1)   Check codling moth trap counts weekly online (OKSIR.org/trap data), recorded on trap bottoms, or emailed from the OKSIR

  2)   Monitor before and through bloom for insects and mites

 •  Fruitree/European, obliquebanded/threelined leafroller larvae and green fruitworm larvae 

•  Pear psylla 

•  Lygus bugs

•  European red mite 

•  Euroepean fruit and San Jose scale insects 

  3)   After bloom, monitor fruit for pear rust mite

  4)   Monitor for foliar insects and mites

•  European red and twospotted spider mites

•  Apple aphid

•  Tentiform leafminer and its parasite

•  Beneficial insects and predatory mites

•  Apply lime if needed 

•  Begin irrigation as needed

•   Monitor for weeds and control as needed 

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed:

  1)  Pocket gophers 

  2)  Voles

  3)  Columbian ground squirrel

  4)  Deer 

•  Keep spray and pest records up to date 

Summer (June-August)

•  Apply other supplemental nutrient sprays (e.g. boron, zinc) as indicated by previous year’s leaf analysis results 

•  Irrigate as needed

•  Thin pears

•  Cut out fire blight infections (disinfect pruners between each cut)

•  Continue calcium sprays to Anjou to prevent cork spot and alfalfa greening

•  Continue monitoring insects and mites

  1)   Use trap data to determine need and timing for codling moth sprays

  2)   Sample for pear psylla 

  3)   Sample fruit clusters for summer leafroller

  4)   Sample for leaf-feeding and beneficial insects and mites:

•  Tentiform leafminer and its parasite

•  Pear rust mites 

•  European red and twospotted spider mites

•  Beneficial insects (ladybugs, lacewings, anthocorids, deraeocoris, predaceous midgesyrphids, campylomma) and predatory mites

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed 

•  Have leaf analysis done (July) 

•  Apply boron to ground if needed

•  Summer prune

•  Harvest Bartlett pears

•  Take soil samples for replant, nutrient and pH analysis

Fall (September - November)

•  Harvest d’Anjou pears

•  Vertebrate control if needed

  1)  Pocket gophers 

  2)  Voles

  3)  Columbian ground squirrel 

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed; if Casoron 4G (dichlobenil) is to be used, apply just prior to soil freezing

•  Irrigate, if needed, following harvest, then blow out lines

•  Remove weak, diseased or dead trees

•  Begin dormant pruning

•  Remove trees in blocks to be replanted and take soil samples for analysis

•  New planting preparation

 

Prune and Plum Management Schedule

This schedule lists the seasonal crop management actions for prunes with links to the appropriate sections in this Guide where the practices are described.

Winter (December - early March)

•  Prune trees, including removal of branches infested with shothole borer and ambrosia beetles 

•  Remove limbs and branches infected with brown rot, coryneum blight,and cytospora cankers 

•  Review spray and pest records, as well as packouts, from the past season

•  Calibrate orchard and weed sprayers

•  Calculate tree row volumes

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed: if Casoron 4G (dichlobenil) is to be used, apply when soil begins to thaw

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed

  1)   Pocket gophers

  2)   Voles

  3)   Columbian ground squirrel

  4)   Deer

•  Apply dormant zinc sulphate spray (before oil) as required

•  Apply delayed dormant spray for rust mites, San Jose scale, European red mite eggs and other pests

•  Arrange to have beehives placed in orchard at the beginning of bloom

Spring (late March - May)

•  Mow ground cover before bloom and thereafter as needed

•  Protect against frost as needed

•  Apply nitrogen, and other nutrients as needed

•  Apply foliar nutrients as needed

•  Bloom and post-bloom disease control

  1)   Treat for brown rot at pink and blossom if necessary

•  Monitor for insect and mite pests

  1)   Put out pheromone traps for peach twig borer and check weekly

  2)   Monitor before and through bloom for:

•  Fruittree/European and obliquebanded/threelined leafroller larvae

•  Eyespotted bud moth

•  Green fruitworms

  3)   Monitor leaves for leaf-feeding and beneficial insects and mites

•  European red mite

•  Green peach aphid

•  Beneficial insects (ladybugs, lacewings, deraeocoris, anthocorids, predaceous midgesyrphids, spiders)and predatory mites

•  Begin irrigation as needed

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed

  1)   Pocket gophers

  2)   Voles

  3)   Columbian ground squirrel

  4)   Deer

•  Keep spray and pest records up to date

Summer (June - August)

•  Apply supplemental nutrient sprays (e.g. boron, zinc) as indicated by previous year’s leaf analysis results

•  Irrigate as needed

•  Hang pheromone mating disruption lures for peach tree borer

•  Treat for brown rot as needed

•  Continue monitoring insects and mites

  1)   Put out pheromone traps for peach tree borer and monitor weekly

  2)   Inspect for green peach aphid

  3)   Inspect for San Jose scale

  4)   Inspect for  rust mites

  5)   Sample leaves and fruit for other insects and mites

•  European red, McDaniel and twospotted spider mites

•  Eyespotted bud moth

•  Summer leafrollers

•  White apple leafhopper

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed

•  Have leaf analysis done (July)

Fall (September - November)

•  Harvest fruit

  1)   Treat for brown rot if necessary

•  Take soil samples for nutrient analysis (before fall nitrogen application)

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed

  1)  Pocket gophers

  2)   Voles

  3)   Columbian ground squirrel

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed: if Casoron 4G (dichlobenil) is to be used, apply just prior to soil freezing

•  Irrigate, if needed, following harvest, then blow out lines

•  Remove weak, diseased or dead trees

•  Remove trees in blocks to be replanted and take soil samples for analysis

•  New planting preparation

 

Apricot Management Schedule

This schedule lists the seasonal crop management actions for apricots with links to the appopriate sections in the Guide where the practices are described.

Winter (December - early March)

•  Prune trees, including removal of shoots infected with coryneum blight and brown rot 

•  Remove branches and limbs infested with cytospora canker 

•  Remove limbs and branches infested with shothole borer and ambrosia beetles

•  Review spray and pest records, as well as fruit packouts, from the past season

•  Calculate tree row volumes

•  Calibrate sprayers and prepare pesticide and nutrient spray recording forms

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage, and control as needed

  1)   Pocket gophers 

  2)   Voles

  3)   Columbian ground squirrel

  4)   Deer 

•  Apply delayed dormant spray for

•  Rosy apple aphid

•  European fruit scale

•  San Jose scale

•  Lecanium scale

•  European red mite eggs 

•  Arrange to have beehives placed in orchard at the beginning of bloom 

Spring (late March - May)

•  Protect against frost as needed

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed 

•  Mow ground cover before bloom and thereafter as needed 

•  Apply nitrogen and nutrient fertilizers as needed 

•  Thin blossoms

•  Place beehives in orchards 

•  Bloom and post-bloom disease control

  1)   Treat for brown rot at blossom 

  2)   Treat for coryneum blight if necessary

•  Monitor for insect and mite pests

  1)   Put out pheromone traps for peach twig borer and check weekly 

  2)   Monitor before and through bloom for fruittree/European leafroller egg hatch, obliquebanded/threelined leafroller and  green fruitworm larvae

  3)   Monitor leaves for other leaf-feeding and beneficial insects and mites

•  European red mite

•  Green peach aphid  

•  Beneficial insects and predatory mites

  4) Monitor for shothole borer (May)

•  Begin irrigation as needed

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed 

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed

  1)   Pocket gophers 

  2)   Voles

  3)   Columbia ground squirrel

  4)   Deer 

•  Hand thin blossoms

•  Keep spray and pest records up to date

Summer (June - August)

•  Apply supplemental nutrient sprays (e.g. boron, zinc) as indicated by previous year’s leaf analysis results

•  Irrigate as needed

•  Hand thin fruit

•  Hang pheromone mating disruption lures for peach tree borer

•  Continue monitoring insects and mites

  1)   Put out pheromone traps for peach tree borer and check weekly

  2)  Monitor and control peach twig borer

  3)  Inspect trees for SanJose and lecanium scales

  4)  Inspect trees for shothole borer (Aug)

  5)  Inspect leaves for leaf-feeding and beneficial insects and mites:

•  European red and McDaniel spider mites

•  Summer leafrollers

•  Beneficial insects (spiders, lacewings, ladybugs, anthocorids, syrphids, predaceous midge) and predatory mites

•   Have leaf analysis done (July)

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed 

•  Harvest fruit

•  Apply boron to the soil if needed 

Fall (September - November)

•  Take soil samples for nutrient analysis and to determine need for pH adjustment 

•  Apply post-harvest treatment for coryneum blight

•  Remove disease cankers and dead wood  

•  Monitor for vertebrate pests or damage and control as needed

  1) Pocket gophers

  2) Voles

  3) Columbian ground squirrel 

•  Monitor for weeds and control as needed

•   Irrigate, if needed, following harvest, then blow out lines

•  Remove weak, diseased or dead trees

•  Remove trees in blocks to be replanted and take soil sample for analysis